General Events

Geospatial Data for Forecasting Global Change Impacts on Ecosystems

Tuesday, February 4, 2020
4:00 pm to 5:00 pm
Student Union, Templo Mayor

dr. Janet franklinDr. Janet Franklin
Distinguished Professor of Botany and Plant Science
University of California, Riverside

San Diego State University
Distinguished Speaker Series
Sponsored by Department of Geography, College of Arts and Letters, Graduate and Research Affairs

Human activities have altered global patterns of biodiversity, and key processes of energy balance and biogeochemical cycling in the Earth system, especially over the last 500 years. These changes have been so profound that they are detectable in the geological record and some have suggested that this is a new geological era, The Anthropocene. Owing to the anthropogenic global change agents—land use change, climate change, nitrogen deposition, altered disturbance regimes and transport of invasive species—the planet may have already moved outside of a safe operating space for humanity in several dimensions. I use geospatial data in my research for monitoring and forecasting the effects of land-use change (deforestation and urbanization leading to habitat loss and fragmentation), and climate change on biodiversity and ecosystem function. Processes leading to biodiversity loss are inherently spatial. Knowing where biodiversity is found is the basis for spatial conservation planning. Knowing where on the landscape threats occur in relation to biodiversity is prerequisite to monitoring impacts. Forecasting where threats might occur in the future allows prediction of future impacts. The effects of climate change on species and ecosystems is already detectable globally, with earlier arrival of spring affecting plant and animal phenology, bird and other animal migrations, and so forth, and with species distributions shifting in directions consistent with observed climate changes. I will show how static species distribution models, and dynamic population and community simulations, have been used to forecast the separate and combine impacts of climate and land use change on biodiversity and ecosystems.

Janet Franklin is a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Botany, University of California at Riverside where she has been since 2017. She was previously a Regent’s Professor in the School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, as well as a Distinguished Sustainability Scientist at Arizona State University where she was appointed in 2009. From 1988-2009 she was and Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor on the faculties of Geography and Biology at San Diego State University. She received her Ph.D. in Geography from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 1988. She specializes in Landscape Ecology, Global Change Biology, Conservation Biogeography, and Geographic Information Science. Franklin’s research is focused on in the patterns and dynamics of terrestrial (land) plant communities at the landscape scale. Her work addresses the impacts of human-caused landscape change on the environment. Human land use—agriculture and urbanization—and other large-scale human impacts such as climate change, and the introduction of exotic species, often interact with natural disturbance regimes such as fire, flooding and hurricanes, to shape plant community dynamics in forests, shrublands, and other ecosystems. How resilient are ecological communities to these past, present and future impacts? She is a Member of the National Academy of Sciences, USA, and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Ecological Society of America. She is an Associate Member, Centre for Coastal Paleoscience, Nelson Mandela University, South Africa. She has published over 150 refereed journal articles and has received research grants from NSF, NASA, the USDA Forest Service, and USGS. Her book Mapping Species Distributions: Spatial Inference and Prediction (Cambridge University Press) has been cited over 2000 times.


Open GIScience

Wednesday, February 5, 2020
4:00 pm to 5:00 pm
Student Union, Templo Mayor

dr. sergio reyDr. Sergio Rey
Professor of Public Policy
Director, Center for Geospatial Sciences
University of California, Riverside

San Diego State University
Distinguished Speaker Series
Sponsored by Department of Geography, College of Arts and Letters, Graduate and Research Affairs

In this talk, I examine the field of Geographical Information Science (GIScience) from the perspective of broader developments surrounding open source software and the rising open science movement. Despite its reliance on code in general, and open source software in particular, GIScience has only recently begun to seriously engage with what are seismic shifts in the underpinnings of science driven by the open revolution. I suggest a number of possible explanations for this delayed engagement. Next, I discuss the obstacles to, and opportunities for, reinventing GIScience as an open science and transforming GIScience education. I highlight a selection of exemplar efforts leading the charge and offer some thoughts on likely future developments and possible ways forward for the discipline.

Sergio Rey is Professor in the School of Public Policy and Founding Director of the Center for Geospatial Sciences at UCR. Dr. Rey’s research interests focus on the development, implementation, and application of advanced methods of spatial and space-time data analysis. His substantive foci include regional inequality, convergence and growth dynamics as well as neighborhood change, segregation dynamics, spatial criminology and industrial networks. Recent and current research projects include geodemographic approaches to neighborhoods in space-time contexts (NSF), new methods for spatial distribution dynamics (NSF), an analysis of the relationships between spatial linkages and urban economic dynamics (EDA), flexible geospatial visual analytics and simulation technologies to enhance criminal justice decision support systems (NIJ), spatial analytical framework for examining community sex offender residency issues over space and time (NSF), and cyberGIS software integration for sustained geospatial innovation (NSF). Dr. Rey is the creator and lead developer of the open source package STARS: Space-Time Analysis of Regional Systems as well as co-founder and lead developer of PySAL: A Python Library for Spatial Analysis. He is an elected fellow of the Regional Science Association International, a fellow of the Spatial Econometrics Association, and has served as the Editor of the International Regional Science Review from 1999-2014, editor of Geographical Analysis 2014-2017, and the president of the Western Regional Science Association.